Beer science

French Press Experiment #5: Galaxy

 

hop-pellets

This will actually be the final French Press Experiment. I did start out with a six-pack of beer that would be run through the press but I rather foolishly put one of them in the freezer. And then forgot about it (I can now see the wisdom of those who ask Twitter to remind them to get the beer out of the freezer).

I didn’t discover it until the following morning. Well, actually my wife found it. The Beer Gods had smiled on me because it hadn’t exploded and left shards of glass embedded in the freezer walls. But it did push some of the beer out through the cap, so I felt that the bottle was potentially tainted. In the interests of science I chose not to unfairly skew my results by using that bottle. So we’re left with five experiments.

In my early days of homebrewing, I loved Galaxy hops. In part perhaps because they gave heaps of flavour and aroma and it was really hard to screw up a beer using them. In hindsight, that may be because their strong flavour could cover up other, less desirable ones. But whatever.

With a Galaxy soft spot, I truly felt adding some leftover hop pellets to the Arc Valley would result in the best of the French press beers. Not only because of the flavour and aroma but also simply because it’s the only one of the French press ingredients that is actually used in beer.

But talk about disappointed. Yes, there was some Galaxy aroma but nowhere near as much as I expected from a 10-minute dunking. There was also some flavour, but that flavour doesn’t pair well with the malt at all.

Of the five experiments, the Galaxy is the one that alters the base beer the least. The others seemed to turn the beer into something a bit different – but this one just tastes like Arc Valley with a bit of Galaxy on top.

What a bummer.

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4 replies »

  1. You would of pulled more flavour\aroma out of the hops by adding 1\4 of a cup of near boiling water to the hops first, swishing around then adding the chilled beer

  2. I dig these experiments, Glen! Better than ones I’ve seen with bacon, you’re getting to the grit and science of it, but still playing around; my opinion is that you keep going! The options are endless.

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