beer review

Beers I Used to Drink – Day Three

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As hard as it might be to believe, in the early 1990s there was a beer with the word ‘‘Foster’s’’ on the label that sold pretty well here in Australia.

And it wasn’t the Foster’s in the blue can either. It was a Foster’s in a clear glass bottle – Foster’s Light Ice. For it was also back in the day when it seemed as though every second beer was labelled ‘‘Ice’’ or ‘‘Cold’’, or even ‘‘Cold-Filtered’’ – it must have been some sort of trend.

And to this day, I have absolutely no goddamned idea what it actually meant. Was the beer made with frozen water? Did they fill up the tanks with water from the tap marked ‘‘cold’’ instead of ‘‘hot’’? Was it some odd way of cashing in on the momentary popularity of Vanilla Ice? Who knows? Not me.

Anyway, like the Toohey’s Blue that has already featured this week, the Foster’s Light Ice was a beer I drank at the Oxford Tavern in Wollongong back in the day when I was cool (or at least when I thought I was cool – I probably wasn’t). Again, preferring to drive home afterwards I’d drink lower-strength beers – this one weighs in at 2.3 per cent.

I recall being rather fond of this beer, in part because it didn’t taste like a light beer. And that’s a perception that I’d stick with today. It definitely doesn’t taste thin or weak compared to the full-strength macro lagers. Sure, that may be more of an indictment on the taste of full-strength macro lagers, but there you go.

Flavourwise, it’s also quite similar to the macro lagers – there’s the cardboard flavour, with a serving of sweetness coming in at the back courtesy of the malt. At least I assume it’s the malt.

It’s an ordinary flavour which doesn’t make me want to try it again. Still, it was good at the time.

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